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Cleveland Pediatrics

435 25th Street NW

Cleveland, TN 37311

Hours of operation

Office: (423) 479-9733

Fax: (423) 472-1890

Office Hours: M-F 8:30am-5pm.

Sick appointments are booked the day of.
Weekend appointments availble during the school year. Closed holidays.

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counseling

Adapted from Healthy Children Magazine, Winter 2007

 

Adolescence isn’t an easy time for parents, either. As children move through the various tumultuous transitions that accompany adolescence — physical, emotional, hormonal, sexual, social, intellectual — the pressures and problems they encounter can all too easily seem overwhelming. For many teenagers, these and other pressures can lead to one or more of a variety of mental health disorders; all are matters of concern, and some are life-threatening. 

Key Tips for Parents:

  • Keep communication constant, open, and honest: Your children should not only know that they can talk to you about anything, you have to be committed to broaching topics of concern and do so openly. Talk about your own experiences and fears when you were an adolescent. Let them know that they are not alone; nor are their anxieties unique.

  • Understand that mental health disorders are treatable: Arm yourself with information about the most common mental health disorders among adolescents; speak with your child’s pediatrician, your local health department, your religious leader, and your child’s school representatives about what sorts of information are available from them.

  • Be attentive to your teen’s behavior: Adolescence is, indeed, a time of transition and change, but severe, dramatic, or abrupt changes in behavior can be strong indicators of serious mental health issues.

Mental Health “Red Flags” Parents Should Be Alert For:

  • Excessive sleeping, beyond usual teenage fatigue, which could indicate depression or substance​ abuse; difficulty in sleeping, insomnia, and other sleep disorders

  • Loss of self-esteem

  • Abandonment or loss of interest in favorite pastimes

  • Unexpected and dramatic decline in academic performance

  • Weight loss and loss of appetite, which could indicate an eating disorder

  • Personality shifts and changes, such as aggressiveness and excess anger that are sharply out of character and could indicate psychological, drug, or sexual problems

Key Mental Health Issues:

Depression

While all of us are subject to “the blues,” clinical depression is a serious medical condition requiring immediate treatment. Watch for:

  • Changes in sleep patterns

  • Unexpected weeping or excessive moodiness

  • Eating habits that result in noticeable weight loss or gain

  • Expressions of hopelessness or worthlessness

  • Paranoia and excessive secrecy

  • Self-mutilation, or mention of hurting himself or herself

  • Obsessive body-image concerns

  • Excessive isolation

  • Abandonment of friends and social groups

Eating disorders

Body image concerns can become obsessions, resulting in startling weight loss, severely affecting the adolescent’s health:

  • Anorexia: Avoidance of food and noticeable changes in eating habits should trigger concern.

  • Bulimia: Purging (forced vomiting) after eating — be alert for both dramatic weight loss without changes in eating habits (which could, of course, indicate other health issues that require a doctor’s attention) and also for immediate trips to the bathroom or other private spot after a meal.

Drug abuse

In addition to peer pressure, mental health issues can lead adolescents not just to experiment with alcohol and drugs, but also to use substances for “self-medication.” And in addition to being aware of the behavioral and physical signs of alcohol and drug abuse — drug and alcohol paraphernalia or evidence, hangovers, slurred speech, etc. — parents should also:

  • Be alert for prescription drug misuse and abuse: According to the AAP, prescription drug misuse by adolescents is second only to marijuana and alcohol misuse. The most commonly abused prescription drugs include Vicodin and Xanax.

  • Know that over-the-counter-medications can be abused as well: Teenagers also frequently abuse OTC cough and cold medications.

Concern about your adolescent’s mental health should first be addressed with your child — fostering open communication goes a long way toward fostering sound adolescent mental health habits.

If your concerns are serious, discuss them with your pediatrician. Because so many mental health issues display physical manifestations — weight loss being the most dramatic but not the only one — your pediatrician can offer both initial medical assessment and also refer you to appropriate mental health organizations andprofessionals for counseling and treatment if called for.

 

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months (although any amount of breastfeeding is beneficial). And scientific studies have shown that breastfeeding is good for your health, too.

Breastfeeding is good for your baby because:

1. Breastfeeding provides warmth and closeness. The physical contact helps create a special bond between you and your baby.

2. Human milk has many benefits.

  • It’s easier for your baby to digest.
  • It doesn’t need to be prepared.
  • It’s always available.
  • It has all the nutrients, calories, and fluids your baby needs to be healthy.
  • It has growth factors that ensure the best development of your baby’s organs.
  • It has many substances that formulas don’t have that protect your baby from many diseases and infections. In fact, breastfed babies are less likely to have:
    • Ear infections
    • Diarrhea
    • Pneumonia, wheezing, and bronchiolitis
    • Other bacterial and viral infections, such as meningitis
  • Research also suggests that breastfeeding may help to protect against obesity, diabetes, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), asthma, eczema, colitis, and some cancers.

Why is breastfeeding good for me?

Breastfeeding is good for your health because it helps:

  • Release hormones in your body that promote mothering behavior.
  • Return your uterus to the size it was before pregnancy more quickly.
  • Burn more calories, which may help you lose the weight you gained during pregnancy.
  • Delay the return of your menstrual period to help keep iron in your body.
  • Provide contraception, but only if these 3 conditions are met:
    • You are exclusively breastfeeding and not giving your baby any other supplements
    • It is within the first 6 months after birth
    • Your period has not returned
  • Reduce the risk of ovarian cancer and breast cancer.
  • Keep bones strong, which helps protect against bone fractures in older age.

Breastfeeding: A Natural Gift

Breastmilk gives your baby more than just good nutrition. It also provides important substances to fight infection. Breastfeeding has medical and psychological benefits for both of you. For many mothers and babies, breastfeeding goes smoothly from the start. For others, it takes a little time and several attempts to get the process going effectively. Like anything new, breastfeeding takes some practice. This is perfectly normal.

At Cleveland Pediatrics we want your breastfeeding experience to be a good one.  For that reason we provide the services of an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant with over 20 years experience in caring for breastfeeding mothers and their babies. Leetta Stanley, LPN, IBCLC, RLC is our triage nurse and lactation consultant.  She has over 20 years of experience in pediatric nursing and breastfeeding.  Leetta is available to help with any problems or questions you may have regarding breastfeeding.  Please give our office a call at 423-479-9733

 

 

 

 

Counseling – Cleveland Pediatrics and MHC partner

Just in time for the new school year’s challenges, Cleveland Pediatrics is offering child and family counseling through a partnership with the Mental Health Cooperative, a nonprofit behavioral health provider renowned for its evidence-based, team approach to helping children and families.

Adapting to a new routine can be difficult for children. There are multiple social and emotional challenges, like an inability to focus on school work, anxiety in social situations, and following school rules.

“We at Cleveland Pediatrics feel so fortunate to have MHC put a reliable, caring counselor right in our office. Our patients now can get the access to counseling they need and it’s no further away than our office is. And, case management is an extra bonus. What a blessing,” stated Dr. Bill Murphy with Cleveland Pediatrics.

With a licensed therapist on site, along with in-home case management, and clinical support, MHC will work with Cleveland Pediatrics to focus on the needs of existing patients.

Cleveland Pediatrics provides medical services to children in either its wellness or illness building, which helps prevent well children from coming into contact with ill children. 

Call 423-697-5950 for more information or to make an appointment for counseling services.